5/17
Discuss Elephant
Continue with project.

5/16
Film review
5/10
Begin Elephant
Discuss Clumbine/Should art use tragedy for story idea?
Quiz chapter 6 due Thursday at midnight.
5/9
"Snapshot" with three quesions from chapter 6
5/7
editing, montage
5/6
Begin editing tutorials
5/3
Film Study trivia (Luke, Jeremy)
5/2
Read film review "Primal Screen"
5/1
Continue Raging Bull with questions
Begin chapter six-Editing
4/25
No D
E=watch through 41, Blog due from study guide.
4/24
New York Times Raging Bull film review
24 minutes of Raging Bull
questions pertaining to acting
Poem in Pocket due Thursday
Quiz 5 due Thursday
Raging Bull blog due tonight

4/23
Chapter 5 quiz due Thursday midnight.
Notes: Chapter 5
Acting:
Stage vs. Screen (relationship with camera):
Method
Improvisational
Technical
Paradox of Acting:
Diderot=actors should not feel the emotions of the characters, must remain unmoved
Delsarte=manual of illustrations
Early screen-acting styles:
Rejects from stage
Sarah Bernhardt
Director D.W. Griffith and Lillian Gish:
Movement s of ordinary people
Stanislavsky and Method Acting:
Bring own past experiences to film
Close collaboration between actors and directors
Handling of expressive objects
Naturalistic (method)=act as if in own lives
Bertolt Brecht
Alienation of effect=limit audience’s identification with character
Sound
Movie Stars
Contract system
Commodities
Typecast
Casting
Screen tests
Types of Roles
Major, stand-ins, character, bit, stunt, extras, cameos, walk-ons
Naturalistic, Nonnaturalistic
Analyzing Acting
1) Appropriateness
2) Inherent thoughtfulness or emotionality
3) Expressive Coherence
4) Wholeness and Unity
4/13
Boomtown, "Coyote"
questions for acting, see screening list

4/12
"Passengers" film short for acting.
4/11
Acting
4/10
"Gasman" for E
Discuss The Fence
Read first part of chapter 5/Acting
4/9
Hand back projects to E period.
Read first part of chapter 5
A period watch and discuss "Gasman"
4/5
Education reform/divergent thinking
http://www.schooltube.com/video/2cb4889891b0c637f8f8/
Finish Easy Rider/discuss ending and "We blew it" quote

4/3, 4
Present projects

4/2
Computer lab for project work.
4/1
Computer lab for project
3/30
No D
Continue ER
Answer chapter question about long takes.
3/29
Seminar discussion/groups
3/28
Read film review
Chapter 4 on-line quiz due Thursday
3/27
Compare "Black-throated Wind" to film as road motif
http://artsites.ucsc.edu/GDead/agdl/btwi.html
http://www.tristudios.com/default/index/detail/id/12
Watch clip of Fritz Lang's M for camera angles
Project due April 4
Chapter 4 due March 29 by midnight.
http://www.tristudios.com/default/index/detail/id/12


3/26
Continue ER with free write
3/23
Begin Easy Rider, discuss ideas of America and historical influences
http://www.goodreads.com/quotes/show/491615
3/22
E=Easy Rider preview
3/21
Watch first 36 shots of Terrence Malick's Days of Heaven
3/20
Boomtown blog due.
Absent. Read chapter 4 and answer any five questions from end of chapter.
3/19
Boomtown, "Possession"
Blog entry
Finish On the Waterfront
3/16
starter: answer question 1, 2, or 3 on page 242
D=watch film to 1:29, free write
3/15
homework:
Read pages 178-188
Know the following terms:
shot, take, setup, clapper, gaffer, grip, film stock
D=Submit project proposal
E=Review Charley/Terry car scene

3/14
D=no class
E=starter, shot composition
finish film, read film review for homework, submit project proposals

3/13
blog entry for homework
continue with film
3/12
Starter: Explain the following quote:
"film is one medium which cuts across diversities of ability, student background and communication modes. When film is effectively integrated into the curriculum, it touches upon a wide variety of skill areas.” -Resch and Schicker
Continue Waterfront. Chapter Four. Blog entry due based on student generated question.
http://ebergman.edublogs.org/

3/9
Watch Bartholomew's Song and relate to One the Waterfront (blindness)
Relate mise-en-scene to Bartholomew's Song.
4th wall, compositional motifs

3/8
diagonals, frame-within-a-frame, looking space, eyeline match
Continue Waterfront. Discuss Father Barry.
Due Thursday midnight.
Please click the On the Waterfront link and respond to either the question
directly or a previous blog posting. Five-sentence minimum.
Blog link:
http://ebergman.edublogs.org/

3/7
Continue with Waterfront
D=50 min., E=70 min.
Project Assigned=due April 3

3/6
Waterfront
Short classes

3/5
CAPT
Continue with On the Waterfront.
Chapter 3 due Wednesday night.
3/2

Sentence structures:
  • Pattern Three: Compound Sentence
This pattern is an example of a compound sentence with a semicolon.
Independent clause [ ; ] independent clause [ . ]
Example: Doctors are concerned about the rising death rate from asthma; they are unsure of its cause.
  • Pattern Four: Compound Sentence
This pattern is an example of a compound sentence with an independent marker.
Independent clause [ ; ] independent marker [ , ] independent clause [ . ]
Examples of independent markers are the following: therefore, moreover, thus, consequently, however, also.
Example: Doctors are concerned about the rising death rate from asthma; therefore, they have called for more research into its causes.
  • Pattern Five: Complex Sentence
This pattern is an example of a complex sentence with a dependent marker.
Dependent marker dependent clause[ , ] Independent clause[ . ]
Examples of dependent markers are as follows: because, before, since, while, although, if, until, when, after, as, as if.
Example: Because doctors are concerned about the rising death rate from asthma, they have called for more research into its causes.

Continue with Waterfront; Terry vs. Edie (worldviews): Darwin vs. Humanism
Grade update.

3/1
Continue with Waterfront; handback starter

2/29
Begin On the Waterfront. 5/5 questions/comments.
vertical movement, mise-en-scene, eye level.

2/28
D period=see yesterday's E period.
E=Battleship Potemkim clip, Luke presents Arizona

2/27
Mise-en-scene (Chapter 3 intro.)
Chapter 3 quiz due March 7
  • Define mise-en-scène overall and in terms of its constituent parts.
  • Describe the role of the production designer and the other personnel involved in designing a movie.
  • Understand the importance of design elements to our sense of a movie’s characters, narrative, and themes.
  • Describe some of the major historical movements in film design.
  • Explain how composition is different from, but complementary to, design.
  • Describe how framing in movies is different from framing of static images such as paintings or photographs.
  • Describe the relationship between onscreen and offscreen space, and explain why most shots in a film rely on both.
  • Understand the difference between open and closed framing.
  • Accurately distinguish between the two basic types of movement—that of figures within the frame and that of the frame itself—in any film you watch.
  • Describe not only the details of any movie’s mise-en-scène, but also the effects that the mise-en-scène has on the movie’s characters, narrative, and themes.


The Unvanquished, Stagecoach film clips
Chapter 3 quiz due March 7

2/16
Rabbit
"What makes this film disturbing?"
Chapter two quiz due tonight

2/15
Ten chapter objectives in groups
(see below)
Film extra credit questions given.
Five films allowed per quarter. One-page typed with ticket attached.

2/14
Teacher absent
Read from chapter two and answer one of the quesions at the end of chapter.
Quiz due Thursday midnight.

2/13
Watch WASP in-full (22 minutes). Paper that discusses movement (see question 3 on page 53) due Tuesday.

2/11
Chapter two reading and quiz due Thursday midnight.
http://www.wwnorton.com/college/film/movies2/ch/02/quiz.aspx
homework:
After watching WASP, answer question 3 on page 53. Use one to two
typed pages, 12 font, Times New Roman. Due Tuesday.

Chapter 2 objectives:
After reading Chapter Two, you should be able to
  • Differentiate between the story and the plot of a movie.
  • Know the responsibilities of the screenwriter.
  • Know the difference between diegetic and nondiegetic elements of a movie’s plot.
  • Understand the importance of the order (chronological or nonchronological), significance (hubs versus satellites), and duration of plot events.
  • Understand the three kinds of relationships between screen duration and story duration.
  • Distinguish characters by their importance (major versus minor characters), their complexity (round versus flat), their motivation, and their role in the narrative (e.g., protagonist, antagonist).
  • Explain the significance of setting to film narrative.
  • Know the difference between surprise and suspense.
  • Explain what comprises the scope of a story.
  • Understand the difference between narration and narrator, as well as how they complement one another.
2/10
Watch Wasp in full with questions and comments.

2/9
Read "The Stones" by Richard Shelton. Storyboard 8 with shot type.
Begin "Wasp" and awareness of mise-en-shot.

2/8
E: Quiz page 53, question 4 or 6 using Spam KU
Lighting (Ratio, Quality, Direction)
Key, Fill, Edge (Rim, Kicker)
3-point Lighting
Hard, Soft Light.
D:Camera Movement
Quiz page 53, question 4 or 6 using Spam-Ku

2/7
E period=Camera movement (tilt, pan, crane, dolly, steadicam, handheld)
"7th Heaven" film short
D=See E period: camera distance, camera angle, Spam-KU
Chapter quiz due by midnight.

2/6
E=Proximics, Shot Angles
ELS, LS, MS, AS, CU, ESU
Eye, high, low, bird's eye, oblique
Spam-Ku
D=Godfather Baptism 36 scenes
2/3
D=See yesterday's schedule for E
E=Starter: What makes an appealing ad for a film?
Watch The Godfather 36 scene piece. Follow with textbook.
Watch Chaplin's piece from DVD
Watch German film "Lock Picking"
Chapter one due with quiz by Tuesday midnight.

2/2
Starter: What genre do you most watch? Give examples.
Watch Fred Ott's "Sneeze," and The Lumiere Brothers' "Actualities"
Genre: the western
http://wwnorton.com/common/flvplayer/?flvid=/college/movies3/genre_western_lam3.m4v&flvimg=/college/movies3/genre_western_lam3.jpg&flvw=600&flvh=400&flvauto=false&flvskin=dark
Notes: genre share similar: theme, setting, presentation, stars,story formula, character types

2/1
Homepage for Text/Quiz and Essay work link
Cover page, questions, and one-page journal entry
Watch Razor's Edge. by Lorenzo Benedick
Chapter one due 2/8 with quiz. Watch a circled film by 2/8.

1/31
Homework: cover journal, pay the man, journal entry (one-page) using one question from hand-out
Film Analysis video
journals distributed
Chapter One Goals:
  • Differentiate between form and content in a movie, and be able to explain how they are related.
  • Understand how movies manipulate space and time.
  • Explain how movies provide an illusion of movement.
  • Distinguish between realism and antirealism, and explain how achieving verisimilitude is important to them both.
  • Explain what is meant by cinematic language and why we identify with the camera lens.
  • Differentiate narrative, nonfiction, animated, and experimental movies.
  • Understand what genre is and why it is important.

1/30
Syllabus
story to film discussion
Shadows by Joe Dornich

1/27
Brother of Mine (Swedish)

1/26
Introduction
The Youth in Us


Film Study
Links:
Drew's Script-o-rama
IMDB
Madison Art Cinema
David Bordwell
The Fence